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Mark Dyson

Principal

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Mark’s work focuses on several topics related to the changing nature of the electricity grid. Mark has contributed to RMI’s work on new approaches to grid resource planning that better account for the expanding role of renewable energy and distributed energy resources. Mark also helped lead RMI’s analysis of the potential of demand flexibility to reduce grid emissions and costs, and has engaged with several industry partners to launch new business models that take advantage of that potential.

BACKGROUND

Prior to joining RMI, Mark worked at Ascend Analytics, helping deploy software for grid dispatch optimization and financial modeling to several large energy companies. Mark has also held research positions at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory working on improving regional electricity system planning models, and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory working on analysis of the potential for aggregated demand response programs to provide ancillary services.

LOCATION

Boulder, CO

TWITTER HANDLE

@mehdyson

EDUCATION & AWARDS

M.Sc., Energy & Resources Group, University of California – Berkeley
BA, Computer Science and Geology, Carleton College

National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship – Energy Engineering

Authored Blog Posts

The Billion-Dollar Costs of Forecasting Electricity Demand

We make forecasts every day, and the technologies and other tools that help us make these forecasts are getting better each year. Weather forecasts, for example, have improved dramatically in the age of supercomputers and high-resolution climate models, and can now accurately predict the timing of rain or other events…

Changes in the Power Sector Are an Opportunity, Not a Threat

On August 23, the U.S. Department of Energy released the findings and recommendations of its highly anticipated study on grid resilience and reliability. Secretary Perry commissioned the study in April, in a memo leading with the thoroughly debunked proposition that “baseload power is necessary to a well-functioning…

The Grid Needs a Symphony, Not a Shouting Match

For more detail on the topics covered in this article, readers should see Amory Lovins’ FERC comments, a recent article on Forbes, and a forthcoming article in The Electricity Journal. In April, U.S. Secretary of Energy Rick Perry announced a 60-day study on electricity market design…

Your Home or Business Can Cut Power Plant Emissions

Customer demand for energy services is evolving quickly. Both residential and institutional customers increasingly demand products and services that are both “green” (i.e., environmentally friendly) and “smart” (i.e., Internet-connected, communicating, and automated). Innovative companies are busy developing new products and services to chase this demand as fast as they can.

Why We Still Need To Discuss Grid Defection

The rapidly declining costs of distributed energy resources (DERs), including rooftop solar photovoltaics (PV) and behind-the-meter batteries, have introduced new dynamics into a traditionally slow-moving electricity industry. This paradigm shift has ushered us into a new era where previous assumptions about how, where, and at what scale electricity is best…

The Business Value of Demand Flexibility

Electricity is the lifeblood of our society, but building more electric power capacity is expensive. Fortunately, there's a lower-cost approach, similar to the method that telecom, cable, and Internet companies have been using for decades to manage peak demand on their networks. Instead of building redundant capacity for each user, these networks intelligently manage both demand and supply.

Hawaii just ended net metering for solar. Now what?

Earlier this week, the Hawaii Public Utilities Commission (PUC) issued a ruling ending net energy metering (NEM) for all new solar customers in the state. Now, new customers will have a choice to make between two new tariffs: a “grid-supply” option and a “self-supply” option. (More on their details…

4 Ways Demand Flexibility Can Enable a Low-Carbon Grid

As the electricity industry and its ever-expanding cast of players race to provide customer solutions, keeping in mind that many customers want more than just bill savings may help to scale demand flexibility even faster than the core economic business case would suggest.