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International

Devi Glick

Sr. Associate
  • Africa Energy Program

Devi is part of the Global Energy Transition team, focusing on on-grid electrification in sub-Saharan Africa. Devi’s focus has been on long-term utility resource planning and energy efficiency program design. In Sierra Leone she is leading the effort to design an energy efficiency program to lower system costs and increase electricity access. In Rwanda she led an integrated resource planning effort focused on both grid planning and capacity building within the government.

Devi has also co-authored reports on Solar PV valuation and rate design for distributed resources, modeled the impact of solar on the business model of a utility in the southwestern U.S., led work on a battery storage road map, and explored utility integrated resource planning patterns and practices in the U.S.

BACKGROUND

Devi came to RMI from the University of Michigan, where she spent three years studying public policy and environmental science. While there she completed a year-and-a-half long, multidisciplinary project developing a guide for climate change adaptation planning in U.S. cities. Outside of the classroom she was actively involved in the campus sustainability board, where she organized student action and coordinated communication with the campus administration with the goal of institutionalizing sustainability practices across the University. Prior to that, she worked in her hometown of Portland, Maine as a staff assistant for U.S. Congressman Tom Allen.

EDUCATION & AWARDS

Master of Public Policy, the Ford School of Public Policy at the University of Michigan
M.Sc., Natural Resources and the Environment, The School of Natural Resources and the Environment at the University of Michigan
BA, Environmental Studies with a focus in Policy, with a Minor in Spanish, Middlebury College

LOCATION

Basalt, CO

TWITTER HANDLE

@deviglick

Authored Works
insight

Rate Design for the Distribution Edge: Electricity Pricing for A Distributed Resource Future

The U.S. electricity system is on the cusp of fundamental change, driven by rapidly improving cost-effectiveness of technologies that increase customers’ ability to efficiently manage, store, and generate electricity in homes and buildings. With growing adoption of these technologies, the electricity system is shifting toward a future in which the…

insight

Executive Summary: Rate Design for the Distribution Edge: Electricity Pricing for A Distributed Resource Future

The U.S. electricity system is on the cusp of fundamental change, driven by rapidly improving cost-effectiveness of technologies that increase customers’ ability to efficiently manage, store, and generate electricity in homes and buildings. With growing adoption of these technologies, the electricity system is shifting toward a future in which the…

Outlet Blog Post

Thou Shalt Store

Solar PV has been the belle of the ball when it comes to distributed energy resources of late. But from microgrids in Maryland to NRG’s solar pergola, battery storage is increasingly entering the conversation, too. Now, California’s new energy storage mandate, AB 2514, is pushing the issue further.

Outlet Blog Post

A Tale of Two Solar Cities

The fight for the title “Solar Capital of the U.S.” is on, and for two towns in California, things are heating up faster than a solar panel during summer peak! On the surface they couldn’t be more different … yet the sun unites them.

Outlet Blog Post

Fewer Midnight (Coal) Trains to Georgia

Aging coal-fired generation presents a tremendous opportunity for our electricity system to transition away from fossil fuels and toward efficiency and renewables. One unexpected place that we are seeing this begin to happen is in Georgia.

Outlet Blog Post

As Obama Starts Second Term, Some Ask, Could Climate Be His Legacy?

When President Obama publicly renewed his oath of office on Monday, January 21, he highlighted the urgency of addressing climate change as a priority of his second term. “The path towards sustainable energy sources will be long and sometimes difficult,” he said.