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Brett Bridgeland

Brett Bridgeland

Manager
  • Carbon-Free Buildings

Brett Bridgeland is a Manager with RMI’s buildings practice. He works on the Pathways to Zero Initiative, which focuses on driving the adoption of superefficient and net-zero energy buildings.

Background

This is Brett’s second stint with RMI. He has worked on a wide range of RMI projects around building energy efficiency, including: a business plan and life-cycle cost analysis for a large-scale, net-zero energy development; macro-scale analysis of the energy and cost savings potential of energy efficiency across the entire Chinese building sector; carbon reduction strategies for specific cities in the United States and China; technical modeling of energy efficient technologies; and carbon reduction strategy and cost analysis for individuals in their homes and daily lives.

Brett previously worked at Slipstream in Chicago, IL, where he designed, launched, and managed utility energy efficiency programs for commercial, industrial, public sector, and all-electric residential new construction. He also provided engineering consulting and analysis on commercial energy efficiency projects for utility and PACE financing programs. Brett started his career as a design architect, working for Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill Architecture in Chicago designing award-winning, high-performance buildings and districts across the United States, China, the Middle East, and India.

Brett is a licensed Architect (WI) and Certified Energy Manager®(CEM).

Education

MS, Civil & Environmental Engineering—Atmosphere/Energy, Stanford University

MArch, University of Illinois—Urbana/Champaign

BS, Architecture, University of Illinois—Urbana/Champaign

Location

Boulder, CO

Authored Works
insight

Energy Savings from Window Shades

Windows are a primary contributor to heating and cooling loads in U.S. residences, due to conductive heat loss in the heating season and unwanted conductive and solar heat gain in the cooling season. Insulating window shades, can reduce window heat transfer, and if used effectively, reduce unwanted solar heat gain…